You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Chess’ tag.

Joan Almedilla

Joan Almedilla as Florence Vassey in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of CHESS that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

My character’s name is Florence Vassy, who at first plays the assistant to Chess Champion Frederick Trumper, who then moves diagonally and finds herself at the other side of the board.  I play a woman who’s fearless, determined and continues to be success-driven in a male dominated society.

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

It was vocally challenging for me or maybe it was just the process of repetition during rehearsals. So yes, the thing that I love about this role is the very thing that gave me that challenge. But I have no shame whatsoever when it comes to asking for help and coaching. I worked with a voice teacher who also studies acting and is brilliant in improvisational work. She taught me many things from maintaining healthy vocal chords to having a healthy diet.

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

What distinguishes the role from other productions is that we discover new nuances every performance. It’s like a chess game, the board is the same, the pieces are the same but the moves are different. They way the other players present themselves emotionally and physically has an influence on the way I deliver back.  What’s great about Tim’s direction is that he laid in the structure and allowed us to explore the characters internally.  The improvisational exercises gave me permission to find the subtle moments, the beats, the things not written on the script, the things not said that would actually connect and would become my character’s thread. There were times of fear and frustration that turned into favorite moments.

What made you want to pursue acting?

My acting coach, Allen Savage, inspired me to pursue acting. He gave me TRUTH about acting. That it is selfless and that it is about listening to the other person. Know the WHYs of your character. Don’t play interesting but BE interested. I was also inhibited as a result of my conservative upbringing and because of that I was guarded, I built walls. I was so stiff. Allen ruined me, tore me to pieces and brought me back up. He helped me tear the walls down and turned my vulnerability into an asset.

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

This is something you can ask me on a daily basis because once I overcome one adversity I face a new one the next day. Rejection is constant, I have to say. I’ve been through the too-fat-too-thin/too-old-too-young phase and more. But being married to a producer/director, I have learned to appreciate the complexity of the casting process.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

Find a mentor. Find an acting coach that you can trust and build a lifelong friendship with. Someone who can tell you what you don’t want to hear. Someone who sees from a bird’s eye view of your career, one who is brutally honest. When you find something that interests you, whether or not it is acting related, dig deep into that subject and do more research. Find something that excites you and it will surely benefit you as an actor. As for the inside job, PRAYER and DISCIPLINE.

 What’s in store for you after CHESS?

I have mostly out of town projects lined up and a festival Award-Winning film touring the circuits right now. I just recently signed with a new agency here in Los Angeles and I’m very excited to be with them and focus on Film and TV so I can be home with my immediate family. Also, I was offered to teach Vacation Bible School this summer, one of the few things I’m very passionate about.

 Anything else you’d like to share?

READ the classics! The more acting jobs you get the more classes you take!

How can fans stay updated about your projects?

joanalmedilla.com
info@joanalmedilla.com
facebook.com/itsjoanalmedilla
Twitter @joanalmedilla

Ray A. Rochelle as Alexander Molokov in CHESS.

Ray A. Rochelle as Alexander Molokov in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of CHESS that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

I play the part of Alexander Molokov (the Russian Second) and he is seen as an antagonist of this show. I appreciate the “bad-guy” or character roles because of their layers and complexities in pushing and feeding the storylines. Because Chess is set in the 80’s during the Cold War, I remember clips of media and movies that reminded me of pieces Molokov’s character.  I understand the intention of his plot points and added color to his storyline by creating gestures and emotion that give him life through my interpretation.

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character? –

I chose to smoke an electronic cigarette on stage to give the character some sense of habit or business. I actually do not inhale the smoke. But there are times, when I am not careful just before I speak or sing, when the smoke has gotten into my lungs which almost caused me to cough right before my lines. Also, the Russian accent I speak and sing with is not easy. But, luckily for me, it is one of the accents I was already familiar with before being cast in the role. It’s a funny thing I like to do to creditors when they call my home… in real life!

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

Molokov doesn’t usually get featured as much in past productions of Chess. The director and choreographer have given me room to make the role of Molokov more memorable in THIS production of Chess more than any other.

What made you want to pursue acting?

When I started in show business, I was originally a chorus dancer. I found that more growth in the entertainment industry could come from the craft of acting.

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

I have been very fortunate to not have faced adversity.  Most of the companies or organizations I have auditioned/worked for don’t see me as a specific race or color. I have been fortunate to have worked as long as I have and for as many production companies due to my ability and opportunities given me to direct, perform, costume, and cast.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

Have a flexible day job or some money in the bank to sustain your craft. And audition for ANYTHING and EVERYTHING so you can start building your resume. As you work more, you will be able to cut your resume down to the things that show your best work!

What’s in store for you after CHESS

I currently have a full-time (9 to 5) job but I have been granted leave to perform as the “Interpreter’ in the King and I for two weeks at the prestigious Sacramento Music Circus this summer. I will also be casting the hit musical Nunsense  for the San Gabriel Valley Music Theatre in late June 2013.

Anything else you’d like to share?

East West Players is a wonderful place to work for/with and I proudly call them my second home!

How can fans stay updated about your projects?

Twitter: @DirectorHands

Sir Tim Rice with the cast of CHESS.

Sir Tim Rice with the cast of CHESS.

FINAL PERFORMANCES! MUST CLOSE SUNDAY, JUNE 23!

Critics and audiences alike have been raving about CHESS! The LA Times calls the rarely produced musical an “…imaginative production…” and Sir Tim Rice (award-winning lyricist) said it was “…terrific!” Join us for the final performances: Wednesday 6/19 – Saturday 6/22 @ 8pm and Sunday 6/23 @ 2pm.

Buy 2 tickets for the price of one! Enter code CHESS241 for the Wednesday 6/19 and Thursday 6/20 performances only. The code can be used online or call Box Office at (213) 625-7000 x20.

CHESS is presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Featuring: Joan Almedilla, Elijah Rock, Victor E. Chan, Carey Rebecca Brown, Ray A. Rochelle, Marc Oka, and Ryan Castellino with Cesar Cipriano, Stephanie Mieko Cohen, Jasmine Ejan, Shay Louise, D.T. Matias, Maegan McConnell, Alex Sanchez, and Justin Vasquez. Learn more.

PERFORMANCE RUN
Wed-Thurs at 8pm Balcony $46/Orchestra $51
Fri-Sat at 8pm Balcony $51/Orchestra $56
Sun at 2pm Balcony $51/Orchestra $56
*$4 per ticket handling fee on all regular ticket purchases.

Student and Senior Discounts $5 off regular ticket price.
Special Group Rates available for ten (10) or more. Call Alison De La Cruz at (213) 625-7000 x 20 for details.

SAVE THE DATES
Wine Down Fridays
Complimentary glasses of red or white wine before the show, during the regular performance run. (Must be 21+ years of age.)

PURCHASE TICKETS AT https://eastwestplayers.secure.force.com/ticket

Jasmine Ejan as the Spirit of Chess in CHESS.

Jasmine Ejan as the Spirit of Chess in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of Chess that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

I’m the Spirit of Chess.  I embody the idea that the world is controlled by a spiritual being who is temperamental, mercurial, full of joy and lives in the moment.  She does not judge.  She is playful when she moves through the human world.  The spirit is basically a more mischievous version of me (although I am not as spontaneous as Spirit and do not have magic powers).

I grew up surrounded by many saints and gods (Jesus, Buddha) – my Chinese mom has many good luck charms and believes in them.  I believe that there are spirits, fairies and energies that lives among us.  The spirit takes many different forms and, when summoned, will appear – so be careful what you wish for!

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

In Act 2, the spirit of Chess is in the form of a Thai goddess.  My challenge is balancing the headpiece (it’s quite heavy) while doing Thai-inspired movement.  During the show, there are moments where I wish my character could disappear, have multiple arms, become the wind.  The lack of special effects in the show challenges me to find creative ways to express the Spirit.

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

I am grateful to Marc Oka, our choreographer, and Tim Dang, our director, for giving me this amazing role where they have entrusted me with the creative freedom to improvise my dance solos.   In a way, this role is like a Cirque du Soleil dream, where I can play a character that moves the show.  Improvising is such a thrill, and thus, every show is different.  My ability to improvise is honed from having had the opportunity to do creation with Franco Dragon for Celine Dion’s A New Day, which was the last time I did extensive dance improvisation.  The difference is, this time, I have more stage time where the stage is mine and the feeling is immensely gratifying.  I am responsible for setting the tone at the start of the show and inviting the audience to enter this world.  This is a first and I LOVE IT.

What made you want to pursue acting?

Song and dance is part of my Filipino upbringing but I am the only one in my family to pursue it.  I fell in love with ballet, a form of acting, when I saw it on TV at a very young age.  After what seems like months of begging, I started training in ballet and had my first onstage experience at age 7 in The Nutcracker.  I have been on the stage ever since, and in rehearsals for most of my life.  I had always loved musical theater growing up but didn’t connect with the idea that I could do it until I saw musicals with multicultural casts (thank you East West Players!).  My transition to theater from ballet was very easy; being onstage is very natural to me.  I did my first musical, Oklahoma! at UC Irvine, the only ethnic female.  I love playing different characters, especially where I can wear amazing costumes.

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

Like in everything, there are good days and there are challenging days.  Rejection is part of the audition game.  All you can do is do your best and then move on. The difference between dance and musical theater is that dance doesn’t care about what color your skin is as much as theater; you just have to be able to do it.  Also, joining the union last year, despite some perks (such as insurance), has its challenges in a down economy when shows and theatre companies are slashing their budgets and limiting union members.  I am grateful to Tim Dang and the team at East West Players for this amazing opportunity.  And in every job, there is always politics and you just have to learn to work with it.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

You must truly love the art- even if you’re not acting or in something, create something!  Take classes and become an expert in your art.  Be passionate and have consideration for others.  Show up to audition (all the good ones still audition), be in their face and don’t give up.  Have good manners and don’t be late.  Make it a routine.  My motto is: everything to share and nothing to prove.

What’s in store for you after Chess?

I was asked to do The King and I in Wichita, Kansas (finally!  Usually I find that only men are invited to do a guest artist contract.).   You can see my sword fighting skills as Kunoichi, Ninja in www.WomenFantasyBattles.com  where viewers can choose the ending (choose me!).  I am going to Macau, China to do Miss Saigon with McCoy Rigby Productions in the fall.  I am also working on my passion project (a product invention launching at specialty stores and boutiques) and organizing an event for charity (I will have a hugging booth at Market Days in Chicago, August 10-11 where proceeds will go to charity- I’m still deciding which one).  If you are passionate about a charity or would like to volunteer/help, please contact me at jasmine_ejan@yahoo.com

Anything else you’d like to share?

Dream and then do.   Find balance.  Exercise and be healthy (I still go to ballet class and I love my chocolate cake).  Travel the world and open your heart to new experiences.  I love my life.  I am grateful to my supportive family, friends, doctors/chiropractors, and coaches.

How can fans stay updated about your projects?

Website: www.JasmineEjan.com
Twitter:  @JasmineEjan

Victor E. Chan as Frederick Trumper in CHESS.

Victor E. Chan as Frederick Trumper in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of Chess that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

Freddie Trumper is the 3-time World Chess Grandmaster from the USA. He has revitalized the game of chess and has brought it into the forefront of news and media due to his bad boy attitude and hot temper. Although he is in an intimate relationship, he has trust and abandonment issues that causes him to have a loner mentality. Freddie and I are pretty similar in that regard in that I usually try to tackle problems by myself and try not to bother others with my issues.

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

It’s been interesting tackling a character like Freddie. As an actor you are constantly asking yourself “Why? Why? Why? Why? Why?” What I strive to do in this production of Chess is to ground Freddie’s temper into a real emotional base because I didn’t want to play him angry all the time. I also wanted to explore the side of Freddie that Florence fell in love with. I mean, there’s a reason she’s been with him for 7 years. 

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

Freddie Trumper is possibly the most emotionally complex character I’ve ever had the privilege to play. It’s also the most vocally challenging (at least the way that I sing it). 

What made you want to pursue acting?

Coming from a Filipino household, there was always music around. My parents were big Nat King Cole fans and they’d have me sing their favorite songs of his. It wasn’t until I was in a 6th grade production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s “HMS Pinafore” playing Captain Corcoran that I caught the acting bug. It was my first real show. I always felt comfortable and at home on the stage.

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

Adversity? Ha! That’s a loaded question especially considering all of the discussions out there about casting Asian actors. But let me redirect that. I’ve made a lot of choices about my career that center around my children. I’ve never auditioned for a cruise ship and wasn’t interested in doing a long running tour because I wanted to be close to my sons. Would I have had a better career had I allowed myself to do those kinds of things? I really don’t care. I love my kids. 

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

I like to say this to any new/young actor who cares to listen: At the root of all acting is truth, so be true to who you are. Be the best “you” you can be. 

What’s in store for you after CHESS?

After Chess, I’ll be jumping right into rehearsals as the Piragua Guy in the San Diego Repertory Theatre’s production of In The Heights. I think I’ll be the first Asian to play that part. I’ll have to check into that.

How can fans stay updated about your projects? (FB, Twitter, website, etc.)

Follow me on Facebook: Victor E. Chan
Follow me on Twitter : Victor E. Chan

Ryan Castellino as The Arbiter in CHESS.

Ryan Castellino as The Arbiter in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of Chess that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

I play “The Arbiter.” In simple terms, I am the referee of the chess match and the president of the International Chess Federation. I also act as the narrator of the story.  With Tim Dang’s encouragement, there was a lot of freedom to make the character my own. I tried my best to make the character unique to me and the result has ended up being a sort of odd, quirky, and funny individual. At least, that’s what I’ve been told. I’ve ended up having a blast playing this very unique character from the vast canon of musical theater.

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

The biggest challenge for “The Arbiter” are the vocals. The score is essentially a rock-opera, and musicals like that are never easy. The character is required to sing high and low, and definitely everything in between. Lots of sleep and lots of water helps.

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

This is the first time that I’ve been a part of a truly multicultural cast, or even seen one for that matter. I feel like often words are thrown out when billing shows such as “diverse” or “color-blind casting” and I have always been disappointed. Not because of the lack of talent by any means…the talent was definitely there. It has just never been a truly diverse cast like the group that has been assembled for Chess. I do feel like this production is absolutely making a statement that pulling from all sorts of ethnicities for casting purposes can be very effective.

What made you want to pursue acting?

I come from a family of artists – painters, fashion designers, musicians, singers, dancers, and my Aunt was actually a very good actress. She still is, although she doesn’t pursue it as much as she used to. But I remember seeing my first musical when I was 4. She played Miss Hannigan in Annie and I thought it was the coolest thing ever. Whether or not I realized it, I’m pretty sure I decided at that moment what I was going to do with my life.

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

I have been very lucky throughout this point in my career. I have very few complaints. However, it cannot be denied that being an ethnic actor does not provide a lot of opportunities in the theater. It is simply a fact. With that said, I do feel like I have had to fight so hard for every job that I’ve ever been given. It is very rare for me to walk into an audition and look appropriate for the role. Ten times out of ten I MUST convince the people sitting behind the table that I’m capable. It’s kind of a lovely challenge.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

There’s way too much. If I could sum it up as best as I can, I’d say work hard. VERY HARD. Every day that you aren’t contributing to your craft someone else is contributing to theirs. Do not give up. Stay humble and maintain an excellent work ethic.

What’s in store for you after Chess?

The day after Chess ends I begin rehearsals for Life Could Be A Dream. I’ve been very fortunate to be an original cast member of the show and I’ve been performing the role of “Wally” for about four years now, off and on. This next reincarnation of it will play at the Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theater at the Pershing Square Signature Center in Manhattan. Later in the year I will traveling with McCoy Rigby Ent. to Macau for a special engagement of Miss Saigon. I couldn’t be more excited for the future.

How can fans stay updated about your projects?

To stay updated on the wildly varying acting endeavours of Ryan, you can keep track at www.ryancastellino.com or you can follow him on Twitter!! @RYANCASTELLINO

Elijah Rock as Anatoly in CHESS.

Elijah Rock as Anatoly Sergievsky in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of Chess that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

I play “Antatoly Sergievsky, The Russian.” I relate to the complexity of his human conflict. For some reason, I am always drawn to characters that embody a kind of visceral dexterity. I like to be challenged and I almost revel in the exercise of finding new dimensions in the human experience to explore. I think we all can relate in some way to Chess because every choice or move we make in life has an effect; some predictable and some not. 

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

To represent the stoicism of Anatoly’s Russian temperament has been the most challenging. He has to show a powerful range of emotion, yet he is very still and rigid in his body language. 

What distinguishes this production or role you have compared to other characters you’ve played in the past?

I’ve never performed with a mixed cast of this nature before, especially with my Asian brothers and sisters, so I jumped at this opportunity to work with Tim Dang and the renown East West Players. I had heard of their amazing reputation but never thought I’d work there until they decided to cast a multi-cultural cast of Chess. I guess we’ve made history and my hat goes off to Tim for stepping outside the box of traditional casting.

Also, this role is very demanding vocally; this is one of the most demanding roles for a baritone in a musical. I don’t think I’ve ever had to be so disciplined in keeping my voice in optimum condition. I am grateful every performance for my classical training. It has prepared me totally for this role of a lifetime. 

What made you want to pursue acting?

For me, it all began with singing in my church at an early age, along with having a strong theater arts department in my school. It was something I excelled at and received the attention and validation that every child craves. Fortunately, I had my mother’s support and encouragement and a community around me to push me further along my path. I’ve always known this is what I wanted to do with my life. 

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

Of course! What career in show business has not? Adversity is what makes you a stronger person and gives you experiences by which you can draw from as an entertainer. Art reflects life and life reflects art. I did not get jobs I thought I was perfect for. I was turned down by agents that I thought should represent me. People don’t realize in showbiz there are more “no’s” than “yes’s”. People just see the “yes’s” and the “yes’s”are all that matter in the end. Having a deep sense of purpose for this vocation is what gets me through the valleys.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

Understand true success in show business is a marathon, not a sprint. Take your time and find who you are as an artist and what sets you apart and gives you a noticeable distinguishable quality. Talent is the foundation that you must have, but then there are the connections and ability to market your skill set to the industry. Just know if you build something special and sustainable, they will come. Fame should never be the aim, but moreover, to become a self-realized artist. Have a vision and a vision statement because success always follows a blueprint.

What’s in store for you after Chess?

On Saturday, July 6th, I will be headlining the KJAZZ (88.1) FM JAZZFEST at the Promenade at the Howard Hughes Center. I will be performing with my 6-piece little big band. Showtime will be at 6-8pm. I sing, tap and will take you back to the days of Swing Era but with a new twist! I’ve even hired Austin Yancey from our Chess orchestra to join me on this performance. See the KJAZZ website for details: http://jazzandblues.org/features/2013/05/westsideJazzfest/

Anything else you’d like to share?

I also play a lead supporting role is a feature film called Salvation Street that will be coming out in December 2013. It’s my second film with producer Brad Wilson. And with the recent signing with Resolution Talent, I am excited about the new opportunities that lie ahead. In addition to film and TV, my next dream is to grace the stages of the Mark Taper Forum, The Ahmanson and Broadway! I believe that every great entertainer must always refine and exalt their art on the theater stage!

How can fans stay updated about your projects?

Facebook: ElijahRockFanPage
Twitter @ElijahRock
Instagram @ElijahRock
Tumbler @ElijahRockMedia

Website: www.elijahrock.net (Join my e-mail list via my website to receive my monthly newsletter)

Carey Rebecca Brown as Svetlana in CHESS.

Carey Rebecca Brown as Svetlana Sergievskya in CHESS.

Tell us about the character you play, and how can you relate to him/her. Is there any part of Chess that resonates with you as an actor, or personally?

My character, Svetlana, is the wife of Russian chess champion, Anatoly. Obviously, every actor will have their own take on a character and Svetlana is no exception, especially seeing as there are so many different versions of Chess. I see her as a woman of faith with a fire in her, conflicted by the love she has for her husband & children and the yearning for that traditional family life that she is simply not getting. She has put her dreams and happiness aside for the sake of her family. When we meet her in Act II, I think she has reached her breaking point and sees this time with Anatoly as one last effort and plea for the family she and he had built together; her dream. In all honesty, when I first read the script and had not yet put myself in her shoes all I could think was, “Move on girl! You can do better!” because I too once had the experience of being with a selfish partner and it’s just not worth it.

What challenges, if any, have you faced with playing your character?

With no disrespect to the very talented writers, Svetlana is a rather underwritten character so it was a slight challenge for me to make sure she had an arc and more than just one color in her short amount of time on stage. I’m probably the only person who notices or even cares, but that’s okay. It is important for me to know every beat of the journey I’m on.

What made you want to pursue acting?

I don’t know in all honesty, I have terrible stage fright. Before just about every performance I think, “Why do you insist on putting yourself through this on a daily basis?!” But once the house lights go down and I get lost in the world we are creating on stage, everything just suddenly feels right. To actually answer your question though, watching Judy Garland, Julie Andrews, West Side Story, Carousel, and Ann-Margaret in Bye Bye Birdie are what made me want to pursue acting and musical theatre specifically. I LOVE the Golden Age of Broadway!

Have you ever faced adversity in your career, and if so, how?

Absolutely, but the truth is every single actor has at some point. You’re too tall, too short, too blonde, too ethnic, not ethnic enough, too fat, and the list goes on. This is a tough and, frankly, discriminating business so I try not let any of that get to me. Just as I do in my daily life, I try to look adversity in the face, brush off the ignorance, and just keep on going the best way I know how.

Any advice you’d give to actors just starting out?

There is so much advice I would like to give and so little time! Be supportive of your peers and learn from them. There is always going to be someone out there better than you are, so don’t be catty by focusing on the weaknesses of others just to make yourself feel better (something I see too many young people do). Focus on improving yourself and always remain open to learning new things. Also, DO NOT EVER let anyone discourage you from following your dreams and passions!

 

“You were all terrific!” Sir Tim Rice shared with the cast, band and crew of Chess this past weekend in an intimate post-show meet and greet. The cast was requested to convene promptly onstage after the show to meet someone, but were not informed with whom.

“Knowing Sir Rice is based in London, it was a complete surprise and an honor to have him attend our production of Chess in Los Angeles.” Says Tim Dang, EWP’s Producing Artistic Director. “He was so gracious in speaking with everyone and taking photos.”

Prolific lyricist and author Sir Tim Rice penned Chess with ABBA’s Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. Sir Rice also collaborated with our theater’s namesake, David Henry Hwang on the Tony Award winning Aida. The Tony, Oscar, Grammy and Golden Globe-award winning lyricist is also known for his collaborations with Andrew Lloyd Webber (Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita) and Elton John (The Lion King, Aida) and Alan Menken for Disney (Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast).

This Thursday (6/6/13) ONLY! East West Players is offering a special “Buy One Get One” ticket to the Thursday evening performance of Chess. Enter code CHESS241 when purchasing online and mention the code when ordering tickets at Box Office at (213) 625-7000 x20.

CHESS is playing now through June 23rd at East West Players. All performances are staged at the David Henry Hwang Theater at the Union Center of the Arts at 120 Judge John Aiso Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012. Performances run Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8pm, and Sundays at 2pm. Tickets may be purchased online at www.eastwestplayers.org or by calling (213)625-7000. Regular tickets range from $51-$56. Student and Senior discounts available. Dates, prices and details are subject to change.

Photo Credit: Mike Nailat

Vidoe Credit: Oishi Media

Audiences Love CHESS! (VIDEO)

WHAT CRITICS ARE RAVING ABOUT…

“…imaginative production…” Los Angeles Times

“Dang chooses the through-sung U.K. version of the show, which heavily features his soloists, all of whom have great pipes. Joan Almedilla (Florence) soars, Elijah Rock (Anatoly) belts with gusto…and Carey Rebecca Brown (Svetlana) showcases delicate power. Victor E. Chan (Freddie) has moxie…while Ray A. Rochelle (Molokov) brings Bond-villain fun to the show.” – LA Weekly

“…for a show that rarely gets produced, Dang should be commended for tackling the challenge — and in doing so, exceeding expectations. Well done.” Edge Magazine

“Wikipedia writes that “no major revival production of the musical has yet been attempted either on West End or Broadway,” and it may be the case that Chess simply doesn’t have what it takes to become the blockbuster that sung-through musicals like Evita, Les Miserables, Jesus Christ Superstar, and Miss Saigon have become. Still, with Dang and company’s creative juices at full boil, East West Players’ revival comes darned close.” Stage Scene LA

WHAT AUDIENCES ARE SAYING…

“Don’t walk. Run to get your ticket (to CHESS)” – Reggie Lee, Actor (Grimm, Fast and the Furious)

“This is a phenomenal production of an extremely complex play. The singers are especially remarkable.” Larry M.

“I saw the original show in London and in New York. This was the best of all – so powerful! So exciting – such voices!” – Charlie M.

“Talent knows no color.” – Melanie R.

“Incredible performances – better than London’s original production.” – Patron

“Florence and Svetlana were electric on stage!” – Patron

EXTENDED THRU JUNE 23! NOW PLAYING!

East West Players has extended the run of CHESS, now through June 23rd, 2013. All performances are staged at the David Henry Hwang Theater at the Union Center for the Arts at 120 Judge John Aiso St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. Performances are Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, and Sundays at 2pm.

Book by Richard Nelson, lyrics by Sir Tim Rice (Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, Aida), and composed by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson (ABBA, Mamma Mia!). CHESS is directed by Tim Dang, musical directed by Marc Macalintal and choreographed by Marc Oka.

CHESS is presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Featuring: Joan Almedilla, Elijah Rock, Victor E. Chan, Carey Rebecca Brown, Ray A. Rochelle, Michael Alexander Henry, and Ryan Castellino with Cesar Cipriano, Stephanie Mieko Cohen, Jasmine Ejan, Shay Louise, D.T. Matias, Maegan McConnell, Alex Sanchez, and Justin Vasquez. Learn more.

Running Time: 2 hours and 20 minutes, which includes a 15 minute intermission.

PERFORMANCE RUN

Wed-Thurs at 8pm Balcony $46/Orchestra $51
Fri-Sat at 8pm Balcony $51/Orchestra $56
Sun at 2pm Balcony $51/Orchestra $56
*$4 per ticket handling fee on all regular ticket purchases.

Student and Senior Discounts $5 off regular ticket price.
Special Group Rates available for ten (10) or more. Call Alison De La Cruz at (213) 625-7000 x 20 for details.

SAVE THE DATES

Wine Down Fridays
Complimentary glasses of red or white wine before the show, during the regular performance run. (Must be 21+ years of age.)

PURCHASE TICKETS AT https://eastwestplayers.secure.force.com/ticket.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,409 other followers

Follow Us on Twitter!

Archives

Categories

%d bloggers like this: